The Best Way to Get Spray Paint Off Skin

When it comes to DIY spray painting projects, it seems inevitable that some paint is going to find its way onto your skin. Unlike latex paint, spray paint doesn’t wash away with soap and water, no matter how hard you scrub. Most people resign themselves to letting the paint fade away over time, however, there are a few tricks to washing paint off of your skin almost immediately. At Spray Finishes, we are electrostatic spray painting experts and wanted to share these 7 tips for getting spray paint off skin.

  1. Nail polish remover. Many nail polish removers contain acetone, which can easily cut through most water-based or oil-based paints. Simply soak a cotton ball in nail polish remover, then gently rub your skin with it. You should see the paint start coming off immediately. Just be sure you get an acetone-based product because there are acetone-free nail polish removers, which don’t work as well to get spray paint off skin.
  2. Cooking spray. Get a can of non-stick cooking spray and spray the affected area. Then, rub it in for a minute and watch the paint melt away. Wash with soap and water when you’re done.
  3. Oil and baking soda. For a more natural solution, mix ½ cup of coconut, vegetable, or olive oil and ½ cup of baking soda in a large bowl. Run warm water over the area of skin that’s stained with paint while simultaneously rubbing the oil and baking soda mixture into your skin with moderate pressure.
  4. Mayonnaise or butter. You may want to put these popular condiments on a sandwich, but you can also use them to get paint off skin. It may sound weird, but it works. Apply a thick layer of mayonnaise or butter onto your skin and let it sit for 3 to 5 minutes. The fat in the mayonnaise and butter will break up the oily paint. Then, wash away the condiments with soap and water and you’ll be paint free.
  5. Petroleum jelly. Use your fingers to apply a generous amount of petroleum jelly to your paint-covered skin. It will start to break up the oils in the paint almost immediately. Be careful to not spread the petroleum jelly to any clean skin in the process because it will carry paint to those areas. After 2 or 3 minutes you can wash your skin with soap and water and the paint will come off.
  6. Baby lotion. Baby lotion contains no fragrances, no additional chemicals, and dyes, making it especially safe for the skin. These lotions also contain oil, which will take paint off skin. Squeeze a generous amount of lotion onto the painted skin. Rub with moderate pressure, being careful not to spread lotion over clean areas of skin. Wait 2 to 3 minutes, then wipe the lotion away with a paper towel.
  7. Lemon juice and baking soda. Squeeze lemon juice from 2 or 3 lemons into a small bowl. Add enough baking soda to form a loose paste, then apply it to your painted skin. Let it sit for at least 5 minutes to allow the acid in the lemon juice to break up the paint. Then, gently scrub the area with your hands and rise the mixture and the paint away under warm water.

These are all effective methods to get spray paint off skin. Of course, the best way to get paint off skin is to ensure it never gets on there in the first place. If you have a spray-painting job on your to-do list, then then consider hiring professionals like Spray Finishes to do the job. They’re clean, efficient, and you won’t get your hands dirty.

Spray Finishes, a division of Stone Services, has been in the electrostatic spray painting business since 1938. They specialize in on-site painting for both residential and commercial properties, and also have a 10,000 square foot shop for large off-site jobs. Spray Finishes’ friendly and knowledgeable staff is ready to serve you at any of their five tristate area locations, including New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Long Island, and Westchester. Contact Spray Finishes today for an estimate on your next painting project.

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